Free Web space and hosting from freewebspace.com
Search the Web

CHENG YEE (Righteous) KUNG FU SCHOOL

> Home Page > Tai Chi Chuan Ledyard Connecticut > Instructor(s) > Gales Ferry, CT. ( Main School) > Wallingford, CT. Satellite Club > Pawcatuck, CT. Tai Chi Chuan > Favorite Links > Private Lessons & Seminars > My Photos > Guest Book > Blog

Welcome to our school reference site

Our school is located in Southeastern CT. This site is primarily for interested students and for school updates.

Two styles of Chinese martial arts are primarily taught, Southern Hung Gar and Tai Chi Chuan. Weather you are looking for self defense or more of a health aspect, you will find some great tools to better your self here.

If you are more interested in history and origins please reffer to our links section to review some dedicated sites
.

Southern Shaolin
Hung Gar is also known as Southern Shaolin Style. It is one of the most popular systems from Southern China. Its origins come from the Southern Shaolin Temple and was hastened by its destruction. Hung Gar is strong, direct and stresses moral correctness. The style is characterized by having strong stances and powerful arm techniques. The kicking in this style is usually waistline and below.
Hung Gar uses the five animals: the Dragon, Snake, Tiger, Panther and Crane. It is often referred to as the 'Tiger Crane Style', thusly named after its most famous hand form, the Tiger and Crane Fist Set. That is however, a misnomer. It is said that southern Kung Fu styles, are the origins of many Japanese martial arts.
This style has spawned many other subsystems and has had a great influence on the martial arts movies coming out of Hong Kong. Our Hung Gar Great, Great Grandmaster
Wong Fei Hung was made popular in over 100 Hong Kong Films.

Lion Dance:
Lion Dance is for everyone to enjoy and to improve their overall kung fu skill. Unbeknownst to most casual viewers, Hung Gar Lion dance builds the great foundation needed for martial arts and the student also acquires other attributes such as timing and rhythm. A minimum of 5 people is required for a proper lion dance: a head, a tail, a drummer, the cymbals and a gong.

Tai Chi Chuan:
Tai Chi is Chinas national form of exercise and is by far one of the most popular martial arts in the world. From an outside appearance it is slow and balanced. It does however concentrate on developing internal power, increased circulation, movement of energies, clarity of mind and overall harmony of the body. Although it is well known for its health benefits alone, it should be noted that it is an excellent martial art as well. To use Tai Chi well, you must have a good understanding of its energies and know yourself. Only then can you apply it. Tai Chi fighting begins through diligent practice of push hands.

Curriculum

Hung Gar Empty Hand Sets:
There are many empty hand forms but the following are The Four Pillars of Hung Gar hand forms: Gung Gee Fook Fu (Taming the Tiger), Fu Hok (Tiger & Crane), Sup Ying (Ten Pattern) and Tid Sin (Iron Wire) Quality, not quantity is stressed.
Weapons:
There are also many weapons in Hung Gar system but the most traditional are: Double butterfly swords, Long Pole and the Kwan do (Long handle Knife). Many of the other weapons in the system such as; Straight Sword, Broad Sword, Double Daggers, Chain Whip, Spear and Monkey Pole for example were added to the system in the ladder years. Most of which are also derivations of or from the Shaolin system.
Sparring:
Sparring is not mandatory but is available for those students who want to develop their martial arts more fully. Sparring is learned in a more traditional manner so as not to develop improper basics and bad habits. First, partner drills are taught, then sparring forms are introduced and after a good foundation has been laid, free sparring can be implemented.

Tai Chi
Empty Hands: Yang Style (Gu Ru Zhang) school of taijiquan & Traditional Sun Style form
Weapons: Tai Yu Gim (Straight Sword), Tai Chi Broadsword.
Sparring: Tui Sao (Push Hands) and Chin Na (Grabbing and holding/locking, also loosely referred to as 'joint locking'.